WPW UPDATE: WESTCHESTER NEW CORONA VIRUS POSITIVES-HIGHEST NEW WEEKLY CASES SINCE APRIL 1 484 IN ONE WEEK. 1.5% INFECTION RATE AND CASES RISING.

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NEW YORK STATE COVID TRACKER
REPORTED 76 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES THURSDAY:
76 PERSONS TESTED POSITIVE OF 4,913 TESTED THURSDAY IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY
AN INFECTION RATE OF 1.5% IN ONE DAY.
AS REPORTED ON WHITE PLAINS WEEK LAST NIGHT,
NEW CASES FROM JULY 14 TO 21 TRIPLED FROM 114 THE WEEK OF JULY 7 TO JULY 14 TO 408.
THURSDAY FIGURE OF 76 NEW PERSONS POSITIVE WITH COVID
LIFTS TOTAL TO 484 THROUGH THURSDAY.
THE CORONAVIRUS SPREAD IS SPREADING FASTER THROUGHOUT THE COUNTY
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WEATHER WHITE PLAINS WEEKEND: 80 MOSTLY SUNNY WPCNR DEGREES AT 11:30 A.M.. SUNNY SATURDAY. SUNDAY: CLOUDY, THUNDERSTORMS before 11AM AND AFTER 2 PM

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Saturday Sunny, with a high near 84. Northeast wind around 6 mph becoming calm in the afternoon.

Tonight A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2am. Partly cloudy, with a low around 66. South wind around 7 mph.

Sunday Showers and thunderstorms likely before 11am, then a chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2pm. Cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 84. South wind around 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

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BUYING/ SELLING A HOME? TONIGHT AT 7 ON CH.45 FIOS AND OPTIMUM CH 76 THE REAL ESTATE REPORT ON www.wpcommunitymedia.org INSTANTLY YOU’VE GOT

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CRYSTAL HAWKINS-SYSCA
PRESIDENT
HUDSON GATEWAY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS

THE WESTCHESTER REAL ESTATE MARKET TODAY

IS NOW THE TIME TO PUT YOUR HOUSE UP FOR SALE?

WHO IS BUYING?

WHY ARE THEY BUYING?

WHAT ARE THEY BUYING?

WHO IS SELLING

SHOULD I WAIT OR SHOULD I SELL

PITFALLS OF THE ACCEPTED OFFER

ARE PRICES AT THE TOP OR MORE PROFITS TO COME?

INSIDE INFORMATION–HOW TO SELL FAST–WHAT TURNS A BUYER OFF?

CONDOS- CO-OPS BEST STARTERS?

BANK LENDING–WHAT YOU HAVE TO PUT DOWN

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COUNTY OFFERS FREE BACK TO SCHOOL VACCINATIONS (INCLUDING COVID 19) AT SERIES OF CLINICS. CALL TO SCHEDULE NOW 914-995-5800 THAT’S 914-995-5800 YOU CAN LEAVE A MESSAGE 24 HOURS A DAY.

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The Westchester County Department of Health will now book appointments for its free back-to-school vaccine clinics in Yonkers on Mondays and Thursdays from July 26 through the end of August and on Friday in White Plains from July 23 through the end of August for children to have the vaccines they need for school.

Health Commissioner Sherlita Amler, MD, said: “Our clinics have the vaccines children need to start their in-person learning on time, including COVID-19 vaccines for children ages 12 and older. I also encourage families with their own healthcare provider to call now and avoid the September rush, because there are many families who must catch up on visits they missed during the past pandemic year.”

All children who do not have their required immunizations must have their first dose of vaccinations within 14 days from the first day of school. This requirement follows legislation enacted in 2019 that removed non-medical exemptions for children in public, private or parochial school through 12th grade as well as childcare programs. Parents and guardians of these children must show that they have made appointments for all required follow-up doses within 30 days of the start of school.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE.

The County Health Department can help. Families with no insurance, ChildHealth Plus or Medicaid, should call the County Health Department to schedule an appointment for vaccines at no charge. 

Call (914) 995-5800 24 hours a day (you can leave a message) Follow the prompts for the shots your child or you need) to find out if you qualify and to make an appointment for these Back to School clinics:

At the County Health Department, 20 S. Broadway, 2nd floor in Yonkers:

  • Mondays, July 26, through Aug. 30 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Thursdays, July 29 through Aug. 26, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

At the County Health Department, 134 Court Street in White Plains

  • Fridays, July 23 through Aug. 27, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Anyone who would like a Covid-19 vaccine is welcome to come to these clinics with no appointment during these times.

The Westchester County Department of Health provides free immunizations by appointment to eligible children and students of all ages who are uninsured or whose insurance does not cover vaccines.

Ask your healthcare provider which vaccines your children need. All 7th and 12th graders must get the meningococcal vaccine, and all students must be vaccinated against whooping cough, measles and mumps.

Health Navigators available through the Health Department can help families and individuals sign up for the health insurance they need. Those without a regular doctor can learn where to go for ongoing primary care. For more information, call (914) 995-6350.

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JOHN BAILEY’S WHITE PLAINS REPORT FROM WVOX 1460 THIS MORNING WITH DENNIS AND TONNY THE NICEST TWO PEOPLE ON THE RADIO ON “GOOD MORNING WESTCHESTER” THE COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT. JOHN IS HEARD TUESDAYS 7:50 AM TO 8 AM ON WVOX.

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“GOOD MORNING DENNIS AND TONNY WHERE IT’S 72 HAZY HUMID WPCNR DEGREES IN WHITE PLAINS NY USA.NOW TODAY IS A VERY BIG DAY. IT IS THE DAY 52 YEARS AGO TONIGHT THAT NEAL ANDERSON WALKED ON THE MOON. IT WAS A PROUD NIGHT IN A DIFFERENT AMERICAN. WE WATCHED THE EAGLE LAND ON THE MOON.

STUFF WE HAD ONLY DREAMED OF WATCHING CAPTAIN VIDEO, TOM CORBETT AND FLASH GORDON SERIALS. THIS IS HARDLY EVER REMEMBERED TODAY. IT IS SIGNIFICANT THAT THE COUNTRY WAS SHARPLY DIVIDED THEN OVER THE VIETNAM WAR, THE 60S GENERATION. THE DAWNING OF AQUARIUS, BUT THE LANDING SHOWED WHAT AMERICAN INGENUITY PLUCK COURAGE AND CREATIVITY CAN AND CAN STILL DO IF WE RECOVER OUR CONFIDENCE.

WELL WESTCHESTER COUNTY HAS TO PAY CLOSER ATTENTION TO THE GROWING INFECTION RATE. NOW WATCHING THE INFECTION RATE WE ARE NOW SEEING MORE INFECTIONS MATHEMATICALLY RELATED TO THE 10 TO 15 DAY INCUBATION RATE FOR COVID AFTER THE END OF THE JULY 5 THREE DAY WEEKEND.

WE HAD 4 STRAIGHT DAYS OF OVER 50 NEW INFECTIONS AND 34 YESTERDAY. INFECTIONS HAVE GONE UP FROM AN AVERAGE OF 34 FOR TWO WEEKS TO OVER 50 FOR 4 OF THE LAST FIVE DAYS.  WE ARE ENTERING THE  INFECTION RATE OF 1.3% ON THOSE TESTED WHICH IS THE RATE WHERE NEW INFECTIONS GROW AND SPREAD. EVEN GOVERNOR CUOMO NOTED STRONGLY IN HIS NEWS CONFERENCE YESTERDAY WE ALL MUST WHO NOT GO OUT AND GET VACCINATED. MORE PEOPLE GOT VACCINATED LAST WEEK BASED ON COUNTY EXECUTIVE EXHORTATIONS LAST WEEK TO GET VACCINATED.

ANOTHER EFFECT OF COVID THAT MAY RESULT IN SUBSTANTIAL PROPERTY TAX INCREASES AS CITIES AND TOWNS THROUGHOUT THE COUNTY  FACE ASSESSMENT CHALLENGES FROM COMPANIES AND PROPERTY OWNERS WHO HAVE SUFFERED LOSSES FROM COVID LOWERING THEIR PROFITS. WE WILL NOT KNOW HOW MANY CHALLENGES WE FACE IN WHITE PLAINS UNTIL JANUARY. BUT ANY DROP IN ASSESSED VALUES WE RESULT IN A PROPERTY TAX INCREASE ON CITIZENS.

THESE ANNUAL ASSAULTS BY BUSINESSES ON THE TAXPAYERS ARE KNOWN AS CERTIORARIS ARE FACED BY CITIES AND TOWNS EVERY YEAR. THIS YEAR THE NUMBER CERTIORARIS MAY SET A RECORD. IT SHOULD NOT AFFECT WHITE PLAINS BECAUSE WE DO NOT GUESS OUR REVENUES TO BE MORE THAN WE COLLECT EACH YEAR BUT OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS NOT AS PRUDENTLY MANAGED AS WHITE PLAINS MAY FACE BIG HITS ON THEIR ASSESSED VALUES.

GOOD NEWS ON VACCINATIONS

AFTER COUNTY EXECUTIVE GEORGE LATIMER REPORTED VACCINATIONS LAST MONDAY IN WESTCHESTER COUNTY WERE RUNNING AT A LOW OF 168 SCHEDULED SHOTS THAT DAY,, 1,774 MORE PERSONS HAVE GONE TO GET FIRST SHOTS OF THE COVID VACCINE, APPARENTLY HEARING THE COUNTY EXECUTIVE’S MESSAGE TO GET VACCINATED AND FAST.

MORE PERSONS WITH FIRST SHOTS HAVE  STARTED GETTING THEIR SECOND SHOTS, A TOTAL OF 1,687 IN FIVE DAYS AN AVERAGE OF 337 A DAY.

THE COVID TRACKER TRACKER REPORTS THIS MORNING 586,301 WESTCHESTER RESIDENTS HAVE THEIR  TWO DOSES OF VACCINE. UP 1,687 FROM TUESDAY JULY 13.

THIS PAST SUNDAY MORNING, 637,920 ARE REPORTED AS NEEDING SECOND SHOTS TO BE FULLY VACCINATED. THAT TOTAL INCLUDES THE 1,774 WESTCHESTER RESIDENTS JUST GETTING THEIR FIRST SHOTS THE LAST 5 DAYS. THOSE INDIVIDUALS  STILL NEED THEIR SECOND SHOTS COMPARED TO 638,000 LAST MONDAY

IF SECOND SHOTS AND FIRST SHOTS CONTINUE THIS UPWARD TREND THE COUNTY COULD BE FULLY VACCINATED BY MID-NOVEMBER.  TO COMPLETE SECOND SHOTS FOR THE 637,920 NOW NEEDING 2ND SHOTS, THE COUNTY HAS TO RAMP UP THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE COMING IN FOR SECOND SHOTS, OR CONVINCE THOSE WHO HAVE MISSED THEIR SECOND SHOT APPOINTMENTS TO COME IN AND GET THEM.

MEANWHILE IN WHITE PLAINS NY USA, THERE HAS BEEN NO INDICATION YET THAT WHITE PLAINS WILL APPEAL THE APPLELLATE COURT DECISION DENYING THEM EMMINENT DOMAIN OF EAST POST ROAD PROPERTIES.

ON AUGUST 2, THE CITY MAY MAY TAKE UP APPROVAL OR DENIAL OF THE 701 WESTCHESTER SENLAC PROJECT

I HAVE TO CONGRATULATE THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF WESTCHESTER SHELTER JUST DOWN THE STREET NEAR THE RADIO STATION FOR THEIR GREAT NEW FACILITY FOR THE HOMELESS CATS AND DOGS AND THEIR NEW ADOPTION POLICIES. YOU CAN NOW RECEIVE ADVANCE COUNSELING FOR FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS SEEKING A PET BY CALLING AND MAKING ADOPTION APPOINTMENTS AT 914-632-2925 OR LEARNING ABOUT THE PROCESS OR GO TO THEIR WEBSITE, WWW.HUMANESOCIETYOFWESTCHESTER.ORG.

IN 2020, THE SOCIETY WAS ABLE TO ARRANGE ADOPTIONS OF 900 CATS AND 250 DOGS. THEY WILLHELP YOU FIND THE HOMELESS CAT OR DOG WHO WILL FIT INTO YOUR FAMILY AND PROVIDE COMPANIONSHIP THAT NEVER LETS YOU DOWN AND HUMAN COUNSELING WE ALL BENEFIT FROM OUR PET’S EMPATHY. A WONDERFUL JOB OF CARING BY THE HUMANE SOCIETY, A PAWS UP PURRRR OF GRATITUDE.”

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52 YEARS AGO TONIGHT. NEIL ARMSTRONG WALKED ON THE MOON

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This column originally appeared on WPCNR on February 1, 2003, and celebrates the Dreamers, the Achievers, the High and the Mighty:

The Space Blazers:

 The Apollo 11 Crew: Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins,  Buzz Aldrin, Jr. Mr. Armstrong set foot on the moon 52 years ago on July 20, 1969 (NASA Photo)

One of the papers I receive at WPCNR White Plains News Headquarters, White Plains, New York, USA did not tell me ALL week this week was the 52nd anniversary of the week when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon.

The exact hour  was  20:11 GMT (Greenwich Mean Time). That was the culmination of the last great American achievement  – the personal computer, the cellphone and the internet, social media were to come  after the amazing great American achievement conquering space in 9 years — when Apollo 11 with Armstrong in command, with astronauts Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. blasted off to the stars  for real.

They became the real Flash Gordons, Buck Rogerses, Tom Corbetts and Captain Videos for all-time.

The Apollo 11 mission was a success.

But there have been the tragedies associated with striving for the stars and being the best, achieving the best, working for the good. Those are the persons who keep dreams alive by their deaths and personal sacrifice. I wrote the following after the explosion of the Columbia Space Shuttle upon reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere after 19 days in space in January 2003.

Saturday’s fatal Columbia Space Shuttle accident killing all 7 astronauts aboard when the historic spacecraft broke up over East Texas at daybreak Saturday morning begins a period of national mourning. 


The expected media speculations have started, guessing at the cause of the reentry that went bizarrely, awfully wrong.
The truth is the civilized world takes absolute scientific miracles for granted. We do not appreciate the courage and skills of the men and women creating the future.


Those of us with cell phones, internet connections, high-speed trains, satellite communications and entertainment (all products made possible by the space program), do not realize the magnitude of daring achievements that you and I have come to accept to be executed like clockwork.


I first learned of Columbia’s fate late Saturday afternoon when my wife mentioned that instead of sports programming being videotaped on our television, there was coverage of a live NASA event on ABC.


(Incredibly, the radio station I had been listening to on the way from a sports clinic had not reported any hint of the accident. That station was Z-100, the most listened-to station in the New York metropolitan area. America Online also on their first up page did not mention the missing craft as of midday. That kind of communications misjudgment is sad.)
As I watched the close of Peter Jennings’ coverage at about 3 PM, he signed off with no recap, no names of astronauts, and some parting words about what he thought was the cause of the disaster.


I’ll write what he should have said.


Columbia’s seven astronauts who died — we know their names: they were

Columbus, Magellan, Cook, Lewis, Clark, the Wrights, Lindbergh, De Laroche, Earhart, Markham, Gruber, Chaffee, Grissom, White, Gargarin, Komarov, the Challenger Crew, the crew of Soyuz 11. They are a handful of the hundreds of brave men and women who went into the unknown. Some did not come back.

Apollo 11′s Crew which landed and walked on the moon turned the dreams of the 1950s visualized in television shows like Tom Corbett, Space Cadet (above, Astro, Roger and Tom) and Captain Video, “The Master of Science” below  into reality.

America’s Spacemen and Spacewomen and the explorers before them are the people who trust in their ability and their vessel to expand the world’s horizons, to know the unknown, whose legacies build a better world. Whose deeds inspire and achievements are the catalysts for achievement to come. Their failures ever reminders of the uniqueness of their courage and resolve.


From Captain Cook’s fragile vessel which sailed the Pacific, to the marvel that was the Columbia, the captains courageous who sailed the Roaring 40s, blazed the Oregon Trail, discovered how to fly, flew the oceans without radar, journeyed to the stars, knew the risks they were taking. They loved the concept of being ever onward.


The media  trivializes their courage, their skills, and the difficulty of what they did and wanted to do, to concentrate on the causes of their failure, as if knowing the cause will make their loss acceptable.

The Magnificent Seven


I do not know Columbia’s Magnificent Seven. I just see their smiling faces in their photograph, and I regret the loss of every one. They had achievement on their faces, pride in their demeanor. Their eyes shown with the glow of being alive and striving to do the great things they set out to do.


Civilization has been created because of people like the crew of the Columbia’s Magnificent Seven, not the incompetence we see demonstrated daily today where technology is concerned.


The Columbia itself had flown 26 missions since launching in 1981. It was guided and outfitted with the best 2003 communications and equipment had to offer.

Not like Captain James Cook’s bark, Endeavour, a 100-foot ship powered by sail that conquered the “space” of his time, the Pacific Ocean. It was the Columbia’s Magnificent Seven’s “Endeavour.” They were tracked, they were backed up, but they perhaps more than anyone here on the ground knew the high dangers of the shuttle mission.


Liftoff, as their predecessors, The Challenger crew fell victim to, is fraught with risk.

Reentry, which needs to be negotiated at precisely the right angle of attack, is equally risky.

Soyuz 11’s spacecrew of Dobrovolskiy, Volkov, and Patsayev died in 1971 on reentry, when the Russian cosmonauts took too long to descend.


No guarantees in real life. Machines sometimes run out of miracles.

The magnificence of the explorers’ sacrifice and dedication, is that they accept the risk of “the Endeavor.”


They accept the challenge, bear it alone, seizing challenge with an indomitable spirit and confidence, facing death when it comes with the satisfaction that they made the effort, and I suspect analyzing, coping, trying to fix it until the end, the very end.

They never give up.


Columbia’s Magnificent Seven, after 16 days in space, are gone now. My sorrow is with their families who will miss these Magnificent Seven, and who know in their hearts that they died trying to reach the pinnacle of their aspirations.


They are only human.


They tried their best, achieved their best, and experienced what they longed to experience. They dared to live the great adventure.


Not all of us have the courage to follow our longed-for adventures and make them real. You can watch movies that attempt to give that experience by transference. That’s why, I believe, you and I take it so personally when we lose heroic personalities of our time. We wonder what they are like. We glorify them, rightly so.

Follow Me! They Say.


I wonder how those Magnificent Seven felt, how satisfying it must have been, to be at your best, doing what you love, coping with the risks.I envy them that.

The Columbia Crew is the Miracle.

In reality it is not machines that conquer, it is the intrepid personalities, each unique, each contributing, who perform the miracles with God’s help. That they fall short is an example to us, not to take ourselves, our fates, or our existences for granted.


This is true of the everyday people we take for granted: the firefighter, the policeman, the train engineer, the airline pilot, the construction worker, the doctor fighting COVID, the nurse, the leader trying to do what must be done despite opposition. All are highly trained disciplined workers, executing precise tasks for which the non-expert has no feel or understanding .
When one of them gives up it is rare. And when they do, they leave the task to us.

What makes for the desire to achieve? What is out there or up there that leads them on?

The Feel of the Unknown


I took Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s biographical adventure diary, Listen! The Wind down from the aviation bookshelf.

She was the young bride of the aviator-pioneer, Charles Lindbergh. She navigated for him in his aircraft, and ran his radio communications on his many exploratory flights around the world.

In a passage she describes a night flight over the ocean, in which she was operating the radio for her husband Charles, who was at the controls. Mrs. Lindbergh is describing the feelings she has as she tries to tune in the South American coast at sea in the dark of night in 1933, 88 years ago.

The feeling, the courage of the adventurer, the explorer has not changed. This is great:

“Night was the hardest. It would be all right once it was day. I kept saying…We began to hit clouds. I could tell without looking up, for the plane bumped slightly from time to time, first one wing down and then the other. And the moon blackened out for short periods.

Then for longer periods. I could not see to write my messages. I stiffened, dimly sensing fear – the old fear of bad weather – and looked out. We were flying under clouds. I could still find a kind of horizon, a difference in shading where the water met the clouds. That was all. But it seemed to be getting darker.

Storms? Were those clouds or was it the sky? We had lost the water. We were flying blind. I turned off the light quickly (to give my husband a little more vision), and sat waiting, tense, peering through the night. Now we were out again. There were holes through which one could see the dark sky. It was all right, I felt, as long as there were holes.


More blind flying. This is it, I thought is what people forget. This is what it means to fly across the ocean, blind and at night. But day is coming. It ought to be day before long… Daybreak! What a miracle. I didn’t see any sign of day and yet it must be lighter. The clouds were distinguishing themselves more and more from water and sea.
Daybreak—thank God—as if we had been living in eternal night—as if this were the first sun that ever rose out of the sea.

Note: This column originally appeared February 1, 2003 on WPCNR.

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